Fokker Dr.1 Triplane (Lt J Janzen)

Manufacturer: Corgi       Scale: 1:48       Collection: The Aviation Archive

Janzen joined the German Air Force on 4 May 1916. Following pilot training he was assigned to Jasta 23 in November 1916 and scored his first victory with this unit before being reassigned to Jasta 6 in October 1917. He briefly assumed command of Jasta 4 on 28 March 1918 but just a week later returned to Jasta 6 as the new CO. Scoring his 5th victory on 4 May 1918, Janzens Fokker Dr1 was shot down five days later. He survived the crash and scored 8 more victories, giving him a total of 13 kills, before he was shot down again on 9 June 1918. On this occasion, the interrupter gear on his Dr1 malfunctioned during a dogfight with a SPAD and he shot off his own propeller. Janzen again survived but was captured and remained a prisoner until the end of the war.


Sopwith Camel (43 Squadron Captain Woollett)

Manufacturer: Corgi       Scale: 1:48       Collection: The Aviation Archive

Henry Woollett began the war serving with the Lincolnshire Regiment and fought at Gallipoli in 1915. In 1916 he transferred to the RFC and quickly gained a reputation as a fearless balloon busting pilot. He returned to England in 1917 to work as a flight instructor but returned to the front in March 1918 and served with No. 43 Sqn RFC. On 12th April 1918, flying Sopwith Camel D6402, he achieved no fewer than 6 kills in one day and set an unbeaten record for a fighter ace of the First World War. He finished the war with a total of 35 kills and was awarded the Military Cross (and bar), the DSO as well as the French Legion dHonneur and Croix de Guerre. Woolett died in October 1969.


Sopwith Camel (Henry Bottrell)

Manufacturer: Corgi       Scale: 1:48       Collection: The Aviation Archive

Henry Botterell does not qualify as an air Ace - he had one accredited `kill' whereas five are required for official recognition. However he gained celebrity in his final years as the sole surviving Royal Naval Air Service pilot and the oldest FirstWorldWar fighter pilot of any nation. When he died in January 2003 aged 106 there were none left. Born in Ottowa Canada in 1896 he applied to be a civilian pilot and was sent to England for training in 1916. He enlisted with the Royal Naval Air Service No.8 squadron in May 1917 but on only his second flight he crash landed and sustained multiple injuries. He was discharged from service on medical grounds but en-route back to Canada he met some old chums from No.8 squadron and was persuaded to re-enlist. His old squadron had become No.208 squadron of the newly formed RAF and Botterell flew a variety of aircraft including a staggering 91 sorties in a Sopwith Camel in just 60 days between July and August 1918.


Royal Aircraft Factories SE5A (Lt. Lewis)

Manufacturer: Corgi       Scale: 1:48       Collection: The Aviation Archive

raf se5a lt c.a lewis b658 nightfigher no61 squadron home defence 1918 diecast model limited edition model 1.48 scale displayed in a mint box. this model is for an adult collector 14+ comes with a display stand made by corgi


Albatros D.V (Ltn Freidrich Ritter Von Roth)

Manufacturer: Corgi       Scale: 1:48       Collection: The Aviation Archive

Roth was badly wounded while serving with an artillery regiment. He transferred to the German Air Force after recovering from his wounds but was injured in a flying accident during training. In and out of hospitals for nearly two years Roth eventually scored his first three victories on 25 January 1918. On that day he shot down 3 enemy balloons in less than ten minutes. On 30 July 1918 he scored his 17th victory shooting down a Bristol Fighter flown by Irish ace John Cowell. Roth was wounded in action on 14 October 1918. By the end of the war he was Germany's highest scoring balloon buster. Of his 28 confirmed victories 20 of them were balloons. Extremely depressed that Germany had lost the war Roth committed suicide. His Knight's Cross of the Military Order of Max-Joseph was awarded posthumously in 1919. His Albatros DV was finished in yellow varnished plywood with all metal cowling panels wheel covers and struts being painted grey and the spinner white.


Royal Aircraft Factories SE5A (Mick Mannock)

Manufacturer: Corgi       Scale: 1:48       Collection: The Aviation Archive

Despite being virtually blind in his left eye Edward `Mick' Mannock was accepted by the Royal Flying Corps in 1917 and assigned to 40 Squadron at St Omer in France. As a staunch socialist his political views were not respected. It was not until he scored his first victory - an enemy balloon that he began to to be admired. In February of 1918 he became flight commander of 74 Sqdn then became commanding officer of 85 Squadron. Mannock was killed when his aircraft was shot down by machine gun fire from the ground - he had 61 victories to his name. On July 18 1919 it was announced that Mannock had won the Victoria Cross.


Sopwith Camel (WG Barker)

Manufacturer: Corgi       Scale: 1:48       Collection: The Aviation Archive

Of the 5734 Sopwith Camels delivered (5914 ordered) none is more famous than that flown by the Canadian ace William George Barker - B6313. B6313 was completed by the Sopwith Aviation Co. Ltd of Kingston-on-Thames and delivered to the Aeroplane Acceptance Park at Kenley on September 11 1917. On 24 September B6313 went to No.28 Sqn RFC based at Yatesbury. In October William George Barker joined the Squadron as C Flight Commander and flew with No.28 Sqn in France. He later shot down an Albatros D.V which he didnt claim as he wasnt supposed to cross the lines but went on to down several more Albatros fighters.


Fokker Dr.1 Lothar (Lothar Von Richtofen)

Manufacturer: Corgi       Scale: 1:48       Collection: The Aviation Archive

Lothar von Richthofen transferred to the German Air Service in 1915 and was assigned to Jasta 11 on March 6, 1917. Lothar scored 24 victories in 47 days and was credited with shooting down English Ace Albert Ball on May 7, 1917. Wounded on March 13, 1918, he crash landed his Fokker DR.I after being shot down by Australian ace, Geoffrey Hughes. In the summer of 1918, Lothar returned to duty and achieved ten more victories by the end of the war. Scoring his final victory on August 12, 1918, he shot down a Sopwith Camel flown by English ace, John Summers. The following day, Lothar was seriously wounded for the third time when his Fokker D.VII was shot down over the Somme by another Sopwith Camel.